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Chatting the Big Chats with The Money War

Just Announced

Chatting the Big Chats with The Money War

Andrew Ryan

The Money War meld Californian and WA flavours in their sound, set to hit the Metro City stage with The Lumineers on April 22. CPN's Amber Fresh chatted the big chats with Dylan Ollivierre, man part of the handsome duo.

Amber: Hello Dylan!

After being part of variously futile and fruitful action to stop destruction of Beeliar Wetlands, seeing how police, big business and government really truly work in collusion, my lady balls are swinging further to the 'anarchy' setting. We all know 'War/what is is good for?/absolutely nothing'; do you also agree 'Money/what is it good for?/absolutely nothing'? My dream is that your band name represents some deep political convictions, but feel free to disambiguate me… 

Dylan: Ah yup, I’ve lived in Bibra Lake pretty much my whole life so it has been extremely upsetting and strange for me to see what is happening with Roe 8. The band name isn’t meant to be specifically political, more just represents my view on the world right now if I were to try and encapsulate it in a few words. It was a phrase that we used heaps when writing our first batch of songs- kind of like an album title that represented what we were writing about.
 
Amber: Same question, in relation to your song "Stars"? Do the imbalances between haves and have nots always affect you, or was it a particular LA phenomenon you were writing about? 
 
Dylan: Yup, definitely. The imbalance is everywhere but LA was the worst and most blatant display of it that I’ve seen. I mean, a lot of people have talked about it before, but it really shook me up how many homeless people there are.
 
Amber: So from the story of your band it seems like you got all the chess pieces in place "industry"- wise before recording (management, label etc), before getting deeper into songwriting. Is that true or have I got the queen in the pawn's spot etc? Are you guys keen on being 'in the music industry' or are you just writing songs for pleasure/other reasons?
 
Dylan: If it weren’t for our manager, we probably wouldn’t have put the songs out - or definitely wouldn’t have approached it in such a precise way. Pete managed my previous band Rainy Day Women and wouldn’t let up on me having another crack. I’m always writing songs - it’s the main thing I like to do in my life, but I was kind of burnt out by the rest of it.
 
Amber: Your songs seem made for radio, catchy Best-Coasty tracks, with the bonus of both of you (Dylan + Carmen Pepper) being strong singers. How have you guys been writing so far? Who's musical heart is in the tracks and in what ways?
 
Dylan: So far, they’ve all been my songs. We have a lot of songs that aren’t as radio friendly that will hopefully see the light of day, but when it comes time to release music, the most immediate tracks usually get favored. We both love and grew up on pop music, so it’s not a specific consideration to write stuff that’ll be catchy.
 
Amber: How do you get a whole band sound when you play live? 
 
Dylan: Live it’s a 5 piece made up of some of our friends.
 
Amber: Seeing as we're talking on International Women's Day, what's it like to be a man in music in 2017? 
 

Dylan: I haven’t been in the industry that long, but in my time I haven’t really noticed much bias either way to be honest. I’m not saying it doesn’t exist, but the people that we’ve worked with haven’t shown any of that. I personally just like good songs, and if it’s a man or a woman that has the better song, they should get the opportunity IMO. It’s not a question of sex, race etc. for me. It’s a beautiful thing that both men and women can tell a story through a song in such different ways.

Having said that, a lot of friends have horrible stories so it’s great that women can feel more comfortable speaking up. Actually, I have had blokey blokes comment that I sing like a girl, which is supposed to offend me ??
 
Amber: Dylan, how is The Money War different to Rainy Day Women? 
 
Dylan: RDW started when we were in high school and I’ve changed a fair bit since then. I think we get an opportunity to use what we’ve learned from past mistakes.
 
Amber: What do you wish people would feel when they hear your songs/see you live? 
 
Dylan: I hope it can be a break from their lives.